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done a study for the department of education and submitted a report which was lost somewhere in the department of education. later, u.s. news and world report tried to track it down. wasn't able to do it. professor judith kleinfilled called and it wasn't exactly 8-1, reporters at the time, the boston globe, as they reported the statistic that is true, parents were told -- much more voluble, and shrinking violence. exactly the opposite is true. the typical classroom, no one calls on them. it is true boys get more attention, more careful research, it was negative attention. boys are more unruly or the teacher will say the president of france, johnny is not listening, there are more reprimands but more positive engagement comment in fact fairly good data from the department of education that they feel they have a right to express their opinions and if the teacher wants to hear what they have to say and far fewer boys feel that way. >> host: that leads into your second book "the war against boys: how misguided policies are harming our young men". just updated this year. the new e
. and by the time i was engaging with the gender educators, i learned that you must always check the data. and i just couldn't find it. he did not appear that the research was anywhere that this factoid was documented. and it turned out that he had done a study for the department of education and it was lost somewhere in the department of education. later, she wasn't able to do it, the professor did a follow-up and he admitted that it wasn't exactly 81, it was less a matter something like that. but none of that, for some reason, the reporters of the time, including "the washington post", they reported this statistic as true. boys were treated much more respectfully and valuable and they assert themselves and girls are sort of lacking balance. that is exactly the opposite was true. a typical classroom, the boys are often sitting in the back to spring the known cause on them and it's true that they may get more attention in some cases, but more careful research shows that it's negative attention at times because boys are more unruly and so the teacher will say, who do you think is the president of
years is a direct result of economic insecurity now. it has led, for spm, to education cuts that have harmed children in low-income school districts. reversing those decisions can still have an enormous impact." but under president obama, america's spending more money on education than any other nation in the world. also, taxes have been going up. and we have record debt. but the left wants more spending and even higher taxes. simply put, the big government spending machine has not helped the economy very much. but again, liberal theory trumps results. >> the idea that so many children are born into poverty in the wealthiest nation on earth is heartbreaking enough, but the idea that a child may never be able to escape that poverty because she lacks a decent education or health care or a community that views her future as their own? that should offend all of us. >> well, it certainly offends me. if children are not getting a good education or do not have proper health care, i'm offended. but you cannot bankrupt the entire nation on some ideological quest for income equality. in a capit
and being responsive and looking at workers compensation reform or hiving -- or having a highly educated labor sector. drive an things help economy. people in the past said, well, we really don't have enough fossil fuel supply. but now we know, through technology and innovation, having the good and fair regulations, that we do have energy supply. so my state of oklahoma, since 2011 when i took office because of our business-friendly policies, education, reform we have done, making government smaller and more efficient, we have seen our economy change. the per capita income has grown by 8% for a family of four. >> it is self-defense. you have a guy who will steal every last job from you if they can. rick perry -- he is glad they are up here right now. while we are up here talking, he had his people on the phone to ohio and oklahoma stealing their jobs. >> we fish where the fish are. and generally speaking, i am spending a lot more time in california or illinois and new york than i am in oklahoma. >> we just beat him in football. [laughter] >> you know how to hurt a person, mary. >> but li
that poverty because she lumberjacks a decent education or a health care or a community that views her future as their own it should offend all of us. the combined trends of declining mobility it poses a threat to our way of life. what drives me as a zbroond, a son, a father, as an american is to make sure that every striving hard-working optimistic kid in america has the same incredible chance that this country gave me. >> the current minimum wage is $7.25, adjusted for inflation. that's more than $3 less than the minimum wage was back in 1968. president obama said he'll support a senate bill to increase the minimum wage to $10.10 but not going to be easy. >> what would the prospects of that be not only in the senate but the house? >> they are not good. it would be easier to do that than to increase taxes on the wealthy at this point in time because that's been ruled off the table by congressional republicans. if you're going after inequality with those brunt instrument, minimum wage would be easier to do. income in equality, the historical trends are staggering. with respect to fast food wo
for your reporting. >>> and now we look at the sobering news on education, and just how quickly the rest of the world is passing us by. we get details tonight from our chief education correspondent rehema ellis. >> reporter: the test results are in, and for american students the numbers are going in the wrong direction. about half a million students from 65 countries took the pisa exam, international tests of 15-year-olds given every three years. >> while 40 out of the 65 countries that participated in the test improved, the u.s. performance remained fundamentally flat. >> reporter: of 34 industrialized countries, the united states is nowhere near the top of the list. and since 2009, the last time the tests were taken, its ranking has dropped in all three subjects now placing 26th in math, 21st in science, and 17th in reading. >> we're running in place as other high-performing countries start to lap us. >> reporter: some of those ranking ahead of the united states are china, canada, germany, poland and latvia, even developing countries like vietnam. >> asian countries like korea, like ja
, julie has done on affordable care act. a lot to talk about today including some disturbing education all rankings coming out. >> we'll get to that. we'll begin with the train derailment in new york. federal investigators are turning their attention to the engineer as new revelations of just how fast the train was going. the train was going 82 miles per hour when it took that curve. it should have been traveling at just 30 miles per hour. nbc's tom costello has the latest on the investigation. >> reporter: on the tracks in the bronx mta crews lifted the remains of the broken train as crash investigators went in for a closer look. tons of twisted steel scraped and crushed from sunday's violent crash. the ntsb announced the two black boxes recovered from the train revealed a stunning development. >> train was traveling at approximately 82 miles per hour as it went into a 30 mile-per-hour curve. >> reporter: 82 miles per hour. only six seconds before the train came to a complete second engine power was cutback. then the engineer suddenly applied full brakes. >> when i heard about the speed,
that poverty because she lacks a decent education or health care, or a community that views her future as their own? that should offend all of us. and it should compel us to acts. we are a better country -- to action. we are a better country than this. so let me repeat: the combined trends of increased inequality and decreasing mobility pose a fundamental threat to the american dream, our way of life and what we stand for around the globe. >> president went on to say that a so-called deficit of opportunity, interesting phrasing there, is much more important than the fiscal deficit, the yearly fiscal deficit in this country which he points out is actually shrchging in his administration john. >> point out, this issue about the young people are disappointed with president and congress. >> part of the obama coalition that got him elected twice is young people, so-called millennials. folks at harvard has a unit that polled these folks. 18 to 25, bad news for the president, festival his approval rating down to 41%. that is a reflection of the population at large but down 11% since just thi
. >> the idea that a child may never be age to escape that poverty because she lacks decent education, healthcare, o that should offend all of us and it should hell us to action. we are a better country than this. let me repeat. the combined trends of increase inequality and decreasing mobility poses a fundamental threat of our american dream, our way of life. >> here to discuss the inequality and prospect of a minimum wage hike, louis from cornell, do you accept the president's argument that income and equality are jeopardized? in. it's a tremendous difference from the experiences that we had from post-war period. it's the fundamental challenge for our society. not in terms of making sure every american who has a job earns enough to live but for those at the top. all that money piling at the top has nowhere to be invested. this is the challenge, the challenge of investment that doesn't just produce profit for the few but jobs for the many. >> stagnating income. the past 40 years, how does that track with the decline of influence with the labor movement in this country? >> it's exactl
then public, on things like education, jobs, people want good jobs. people want the american dream. if you look at the muscles in the -- if you look at doug post,ck's recent blog which i think was not in "atlantic" but it "politico"? sorry. thatnk it is totally right one of the great unifying factors in this country was if by a sethard, and play of fairness rules, you should do ok. kids,r guidepost for our the next generation, are they doing better than they are. that has changed. and people are really anxious about that. they want to work hard and they want to do ok. so i think there is -- when i looked at the elections, in new, chris christie won in jersey, that is true, but so did minimum wage expansion. virginia,liffe won in walsh in boston, palacios in new york. the person who was protested education -- >> could you speak up? >> the person who was pro- education won. so there is something going on in the country that is about, yes, working hard. nobody wants a handout. but let's level the playing field so we have great public education and we have ways for people to enter or reenter o
the variety of views we had for instance when the heritage foundation -- heritage was about education reform and getting a lot of different conservatives together. they would fight like heck about the best way forward on education reform, the best way forward on tax reform. jack kempe would have horrible fights with phil gramm and others and then they would come together and come up with a tax reform plan. there were to be constant battles on the budget. there were a lot of different ways forward in the conservatives we believe even into the 90s, 1994 we always talked about a legislative laboratory of ideas and you talked about the place of ideas and we talked about the free marketplace of ideas. we would close the doors and go downstairs and debate nonstop among ourselves until we came up with the best plan for reform moving for it. just not the case anymore. if you veer off the path a little bit to the right or a little bit to the left there are ideological witch hunts and people suggesting you are insufficiently conservative and insufficiently republican. that is the 9% party. that's the
. >>> a troubling trend when it comes to american kids and education. why they are lagging behind their overseas counter parts. >>> there's safety briefing requirement put into effect for all new york metro transit workers in the wake of sunday's deadly train derailment. investigators are trying to determine how and why that derailment happened. jay gray has the latest on the search for clues at the scene in the bronx. jay? >> reporter: hey, there, good evening, pat. two days later, there's more questions than answers here right now. one of the biggest questions continues to be, was the accident caused by mechanical or human error. >> a >> reporter: for the first time today, we are hearing the radio calls from the first firefighters on the scene of sunday's deadly north commuter train accident. in the wake of the tragedy, we are learning more about the man at the controls of the train. 46-year-old william rockefeller, a veteran engineer was injured in the accident. nbc news confirmed he told investigators he zoned out and doesn't recall any specifics about the moments before the train left the t
to continue his education at florida state. >>> and in the nfl, two teams moving in different directions meet on thursday night. jacksonville, winners in three of their last four games, hosting houston, losers of ten straight. the jaguars used some trickery. ace sanders catching a lateral pass and throws it to jordan todman for a third quarter touchdown. the jags win, 27-20. >>> finally, nelson mandela once said sport has the power to change the world. as a young man, the human rights leader was an accomplished amateur boxer. a year after his historic election as south africa's first president was credited with bringing his nation together at the world cup final which south africa won. he got to host the2010 world cup. the first time that tournament was ever held in africa. and he was known for inspiring athletes across generations. boxing legend muhammad ali had this to say about mandela. he was a man whose heart, soul, and spirit could not be contained or restrained by racial and economic injustices, metal bars, or the burden of hate and revenge. >>> coming up after your local news on "cbs
pulling women into the workforce like education and service sector. those are still growing but not growing so fast relative to other parts of the economy. that pulled women in. the growth of women's presence in education and higher education, increased in the '70s and 80s and plateaued sometime in the '90s, depending on which measure you look at. and then we really saw strong pattern of women entering men's occupations, especially in middle class jobs, those women, college graduates, but not so much movement the other way. women were entering professions like law and medicine or realty or educational administration that had been previously male jobs. but men weren't going into nursing and teaching preschool and elementary school -- >> let's look at some of those numbers. that is such a shocking part of your study. one in four men actually work in fields you report that are dominated 90% by males. one in three women work in fields that have 80% of women in the workplace of the your study tells the story of a professional environment in the united states where huge, huge port
's education as a pathway to success and has used the platform of college president to advance and highlight president helen drinan of simmons college. [applause] >> thank you. good evening from all of us at simmons college. we are honored to serve as the major academic sponsor for this event. when gloria steinem visited simmons last spring, she explained to us that anyone who believes in equal rights for both men and women is a feminist. surely the woman we celebrate this evening, angelina grimke, was not only an abolitionist, but also an early feminist. i would also like to suggest to that the founder of simmons college, john simmons, a true ally of women of his age, was also a feminist. at the very time in 1838 that angelina grimke was speaking to the massachusetts state legislature against slavery and for a woman's right to vote, only a mile away in the north end, john simmons was actively growing his tailoring business, employing many women here in boston and in the countryside around the city. having observed that most of his customers fell into standard sizes, he departed from custom
mandela and it will be tomorrow at f and b stadium in johannesburg and a belief that education was the only way for people to raise up from poverty and where that legacy stands today. and revolutionary cancer treatment and using one deadly disease to battle another. >> i'm mark and coming up, the afc race is heating up as manning is a leg up on the competition, that is ahead in sports. >>> wintry conditions will improve today but i'm tracking another round of snow for the northeast, i'll have details coming up. >>> al jazeera america continues and thomas and i are back with you in just 2 1/2 minutes. ♪ straight to the point. >> i'm on the ground every day finding stories that matter to you. >> in new orleans... >> seattle bureau... >> washington... >> detroit... >> chicago... >> nashville... >> los angeles... >> san francisco... >> al jazeera america, take a new look at news. >> from our headquarters in new york, here are the headlines this hour. >> al jazeera america is the only news channel that brings you live news at the top of every hour. >> a deal in the senate may be a
that the congressional black caucus under the leadership of our chairwoman has been strong and educating our constituents about the affordable care act. in conclusion, a remaining challenge that we have. the voting acts must be re-authorized that was eliminated by the supreme court that took away the provisions of pre-clearance, which, in fact, provided justice and the right to vote for all americans. we are gathered hopefully in a bipartisan manner, the leadership of mr. sensenbrenner and others who are on various committees and the congressional black caucus and the leadership of our congressional black caucus to come together to be able to accept the constitutional premise, best said by the constitution, we are created equal. and we have coddled the right to vote, welcomed the right to ote, reading a story about our puerto rico and citizens. and those of us on the mainland who have had obstacles thrown at us across the pathway that needed to be protected not only by the bill of rights, but by the voting rights act that withstood the test of time and it is important that we get a construct that all of
is it the education outcomes continue to decline when we increase federal control year after year after year but yet our outcomes continue to decline? even this week, another international poll coming out for that. why is it getting harder to start a company, find a job, pay your gas bill? why is it hard to fill up your gas and pay your cell phone? it's increasing fees and control and americans continue to get frustrated because they know this is not what we were designed to be. we're doing too many things. we've got to get back to trusting the american people, our state leaders, our local leaders and we've got to set the standard for what leadership looks like in america by our rhetoric and by our actions. we can honor people and honor each other even in our differences, but we've got to get back to doing this nation's business the way that american people in their heart know it should be done, where their voices are heard and where they get to make the decisions. with that i yield back. . the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes the gentleman from california, mr. miller, for five minutes. mr.
not only had an incredibly active career, but some of the u.s. concentrated on higher education and educating himself. he is a man with three graduate degrees, including one from the u.s. naval war college, and i should add that we were proud to present him with an honorary degree here just a couple of years ago. i should not neglect to say, general flynn has been given many awards, including the defense superior service medal with three oakley's clusters, the legion of merit with an of leaf cluster, the brand star, the meritorious service medal and others that are not too numerous to mention. he is a great friend of this school, and we are honored that you could join us and the floor is yours. >> thank you. [applause] >> great. first, before i get into some formal remarks, i hopefully -- everyone got handed out one of these. it is that there are your see your you got it when you walked in. a pamphlet about the defense intelligence agency and other about who we are all we're doing a behalf of national security for this country. it will give you some idea about the direction of o
some of the people behind this education revolution. >>> and taking a live look outside at 8:37. we have live sky 7 hd looking out over mt.dy on diabldiablo. there's snow on some mountain tops this morning in the bay area. snow in the last couple of hours. hours. lisa argen will fill y to those who've been denied equal access to health care... welcome to covered california. now, you can no longer be denied coverage because of a pre-existing condition. enroll today at coveredca.com. can impart one lesson to a new business owner, it would be one thing i've learned is my philosophy is real simple american express open forum is an on-line community, that helps our members connect and share ideas to make smart business decisions. if you mess up, fess up. be your partners best partner. we built it for our members, but it's open for everyone. there's not one way to do something. no details too small. american express open forum. this is what membership is. this is what membership does. >>> welcome back, everyone. it is 8:40 on saturday morning. you are looking live at boulder creek in san
. the hearing is scheduled for sometime later this month. the department of education also releasing a recent report basically stating the commission has not received educator confidence which is a requirement. the college is moving forward. you can keep track tst progress on a -- of the progress. on the website. back to you. >>> happening today, a man suspected of killing another man over a video game system in san francisco is due no in court. the system, ronnie collins is accused of the fatal shooting of 22-year-old ikenna on sunday in the bayview district. ikenna posted an onlined a for a playstation -- online ad for a playstation. >>> also later today, the suspect in the l.a.x. shooting rampage will also make his first court appearance. 23-year-old paul ciancia will be at a san bernardino county jail. he's being held in federal custody, accused of walking into terminal 3 last month and killing a tsa officer and wounding three other people. investigators say he had a vendetta against the federal government. >>> 7:39. the autopsy on paul walker is complete and the results are expected some
of individual employment the administrative burden of educating and processing enrollments and declinatideclinati on's can prove almost as expensive as the coverage itself. restauranrestauran ts cannot absorb this cost and ultimately the cost will be borne by the public as a whole. the implementation threatens the safe haven of the flexible work environment for those who depend on it. thank you for the opportunity to testify before you today regarding the health care law and its effects of the business aggregation rules on small businesses like ours. i'm proud and grateful for the responsibility to serve my community in austin texas serving customers. we are committed to working with congress to find solutions that foster growth and truly benefit the communities we serve. >> thank you mr. winstanley. our final witnesses donna baker. she holds an mba from michigan state university and a b.a. in accounting from siena heights university. welcome. >> thank you chairman collins and ranking member velazguez and members of the committee. it's an honor to be here to testify on this
that poverty because she lacks a dicent education or health care or a community that views her future as their own, that should affect all of us. >> it should compel us to action. we are a better country. let me repeat. the combined trends of inceffed inequality pose a fundamental effect. >> republicans were quick to cit size of president's remarks. the income gap is caused by policies claiming that the affordable care act and tougher business regulations encourage company depends on the government. the statistics are telling. from 2009 to 2012 the average engine from the top 1% of earners increased 31%. incomes for the rest of the nation's workers rose by one half of one%. >> thousands of fast-food workers scheduled to last their ship are striking. in 100 cities they are striking, demanding pay. today's strikes are the latest move in a campaign that started last summer. the medium wage is slightly more than $900. >> the workers live in poverty, working in conditions. >> more than two and a quarter americans have non-management jobs with the top 10 fast food chains. anti-government fo
as to what they can do. if you have just a high school education -- i only had a high school education. the jobs were there when i came out of high school. it was not i thought. a kid with a high school education is pretty much in a deadlocked situation now. if he can even get a job. that is what needs to be done in my personal opinion. host: david in florida. caller: good morning. i believe that you are totally impartial and the way you do your job. thank you. i agree with a lot of what this gentleman was saying with regard to manufacturing. they are talking about raising the minimum wage to stimulate the economy. what are they consider stimulating the economy? putiding jobs for kids to something on the shelf at walmart? we don't make anything. it goes back to china. as far as the raising of the minimum wage, what people fail to realize is that when they raise it here and there -- to the average guy getting it, it is not that much money in his pocket every week. collectively throughout the nation, that is a whole lot more money that the government can tax and take from you. if they ra
, the administrative urban of educating and processing the enrollments prove almost as expensive as coverage itself. absorb thiscannot cost and ultimately the cost will be warmed by the public as a whole. the implementation also threatens the safety haven of a flexible work environment by those that work on it. inc. you again for the opportunity to testify today regarding health care law and its effects on the aggregation rules for small businesses like ours. we are committed to working with congress to find solutions that foster growth and truly benefit the communities we serve. >> thank you. our final witnesses donna baker. she is a certified public accountant in adrian michigan. she holds an nba from michigan state university and a ba in accounting. mba from michigan state university and a ba in accounting. >> thank you chairman collins, ranking member alaska's and other members of the committee. it is an honor to be here to testify on this subject. i am donna baker. my own accounting firm for the last 13 years. practice in michigan, a very small rural area. firm iof owning my own also own a sma
tampa bay chamber of commerce says employers in this area are frustrated with the education system. he says there's no push for students to learn the trades, but it's imperative they do, as most of the current workforce in manufacturing is aging. he says the school system is just not teaching kids how to get their hands dirty. and up through the college level, students aren't thinking manufacturing as a career. we don't have the opportunity where kids are getting hands on on things and getting that curiosity and that mechanical interest to do stuff, we have a lack of interest in those hands on things and manufacturing is a hands on sport. they're not interested because they're not exposed to it, they don't know it's out there - they go through school and it's the basic lawyers and doctors, what are you gong to be, you gotta go to college, they don't realize there's a whole market out there in manufacturing. peck is trying to spark interest in manufacturing. he's not waiting on the government or the education system. he's taken it upon himself to recruit the right workers and personall
you the poster child for south africa's education. the mandela family was quoted describing you as the face of the new south africa. what is the face of the young generation of post-apartheid south africa. >> i think the young face of this new south africa is a dynamic face. we don't - our revolution will not be a political one. our revolution will be a revolution driven by innovation and prosperity across all income levels in south africa. we are very dynamic generation. my story is like that of millions of south africans. >> you describe this challenge rising to the challenge of innovation. what about domestically are there changes to that that young people face in south africa as they try to meet a global threshold to be competitive. >> certainly, which is why i believe my story resonates. a challenge is education. more south africans, world class education. the commitment to education, not just education, but achieving excellence. it's a challenge that i am sure my peers will adopt in the next couple of years. >> speaking of achieving educational excellence. is it true that
and schools were built so that now kids, including her son, can have an education. alex? >> that's a great story too. you've got so many from there, michelle. very quickly, the memorial tuesday, because of the enormity of that stadium in which it's going to be held s that the one that is being more focused upon and also given all the world leaders that are expected to attend, that over the funeral on sunday next week? >> reporter: it does require logistical planning. however, i will say the state funeral, which is going to be big, is in a remote village, his hometown. so people are going to have to get there. that's going to be a difficult process as well. that is expected to be huge because it's really going to be the last step in this mourning process. world leaders, some of them, we don't know exactly who yet, are expected to attend that as well. but all of this has had that sense of importance, this outpouring. just standing out here, you know, these beautiful, spontaneous songs will break out. the entire crowd joins in or just walking down a street. you walk by someone and they're jus
>> get your damn education. >> ...surprising >> oh, absolutely! >> ...exclusive one-on-one interviews with the most interesting people of our time. >> you're listening because you want to see what's going to happen. >> i want to know what works what do you know works? >> conversations you won't find anywhere else. >> talk to al jazeera. >> only on al jazeera america. >> oh my! >> the vilification, targeting of immigrants in the u.s. isn't anything new. but since the mi the mid 90s, after the oklahoma city bombings in 1995, congress passed laws expanding the grounds for the detention and deportation of noncitizens. for national security reasons and set up a registry for those from predominantl predominantlym countries. in 2003, the bush administration created ice, under the newly formed department of homeland security, its ten year goal was to deport every single deportable noncitizen in the country. two years later the bush administration expanded the detention of criminal prosecution of undocumented people crossing the border. >> undocumented individuals to enter our country represen
that were made from inside sandy hook elementary school the day of killed 20 students and six educators. this is after the state prosecutor dropped his fight to continue withholding the calls. he's been ordered to release them. state's attorney stephen sedensky the third had argued that survivors of last december's newtown shooting deserved special protection as victims of child abuse. >> today. authorities are expected to release the results of autopsies on the two bodies recovered from the fiery crash that killed "fast & furious" actor paul walker and his friend.roger rodas. walker's publicist has said the actor was the passenger when rodas' 2005 porsche carrera gt crashed into a light pole and tree and exploded into flames saturday. the families of both men have provided dental records, which will allow not only formal identification of the bodies, but also official word on whether walker or rodas was behind the wheel. three universal pictures will donate a percentage of the proceeds from fast-and- furious six to paul walker's non-profit. walker helped establish "reach out worldwide"
$40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. officers under investigation, suspected of running a prostitution ring. >> officers went to his home searching for a missing 16-year- old girl. is outside of the officer's home in southeast with the details. roz? documents, weurt discovered when investigators came here tuesday night, that police officer answer the door himself. he smelled the strong odor of marijuana and found more marijuana on the inside. here is some video we captured upon the search going on last night. inside the apartment, investigators found two young women, one who was 18, the other the 16-year-old missing girl. they had been searching for her. she told investigators she had been there several times and had met six other females. he told -- she said they had worked as prostitutes for the officers. he took voters of her nude wearing sparkly high heels. he told her her nickname would be juicy and he ha
're gonna give people what here to take care of the spread we would try to do more education and enforcement. >> within a few minutes, the police was on the scene and educated. >> you are not suppose to enter into right here. there is a line in the street to tell you. >> there in force in the role of the bike lanes. maligned these dedicated bike lanes are for bicyclist on less, one you are about to park and you cannot crews looking for a spot. you cannot emerge when there is a break in the by claimed similar to this. >> muni buses are not allowed to use the biplanes to keep on schedule. bike lanes, are for bikes. >> this guy gave me a piece of his mind. >> i teach a the university. i am serious about the spread i do not see you be a part of the solution. >> there you have it, he was driving e illegally and he got a ticket and he stated it was my fault. >> since no matter where you want to put the blame on, the lost a lot. maligned >> as san francisco, still the robbers, kron4 milin san fry roberts kron 4 news. >> coming up on the kron4 morning news. batkid is making his return to san francis
don't have a job and you're in school and you're trying to better yoursel your education and you're burdened now with the demand that you get health care and you don't feel that you need it, you can't afford it, but there's a $95 fine you can pay to absolve you of your liability, of course they're going to do that. guess what, where are the young people, most of them, getting their funds from? either working one or two jobs and going to school or they're living with their parents and their parents are not going to foot the bill. >> how does it make sense, richard, to a young person to pay more for insurance than he or she otherwise would be doing so, so as to underwrite old americans, many of whom likely have more money than he or she, that young person does. how does that make sense? >> greg, i don't think it's making sense or not making sense issue. i think one, what brad is talking about, is a lot of college students and law students and ph.d. students are eligible to go back on their parent's health care insurance thanks to the affordable care act. so 3 million of them are al
of a pioneer of the future. the stated goal of udacity is to provide higher education for 90% reduction in cost. and so recently they announced at georgia tech that u, the acity was now going to take a $70,000 residential master's degree in advanced computing, and they were going to offer the master's degree online for $7,000. first of all, think about what that does to student loans. second, if you're an adult and this is a class you really need but you live in minnesota or you live in southern california and you're not going to move to georgia tech, you can now take it in the mornings, on the weekends, while you're on vacation. all of a sudden we've begun to liberate you from the professor's schedule. most education is stunningly inefficient. the course will be offered from 10:20 to 11:40 at the convenience of the professor three days a week. well, that's not -- that's the world that's going to rapidly disappear despite every effort of the prison guards at the university system to block it. the most famous example -- you can go look these things up yourself. i'm not making any of this stuff u
that today or tomorrow. the operator did survive. he was injured. educated that he tried to apply the brakes, that the train was coming into the curve quickly and he tried to apply the brakes. they want to see what that operator has to say. the speed in that part of the rail should have been 30 miles an hour. the train would have needed to slow from 70-mile an hour on the straight away to that 30 miles an hour. did that happen? investigators will be back on the rails today to try to look at the rails and the crumbled cars themselves to see what they can learn from that. >> ok. lisa stark reporting to us from washington. thank you. >> metro north has been working to prevent accidents. we have a look at some prior accidents in the mta history. >> it carries more than 82 million people a year, which is the busiest in the country. it's part of new york's metropolitan transportation authority. it is a system of subways, buses and commuters trains. the deadliest crash was in 1918 when a subway driver lost control in brooklyn. the last time passengers were killed in an m.t. the a. crash was 1991 wh
for a country that spends more on education than anything else. it's a key test given to 15-year-olds in 65 countries. the u.s. ranks 36th in math. east asian countries top all three categories in science, the u.s. ranks 28th. only in reading are u.s. students really above average and still pretty much in the middle of the pack. shanghai takes every spot but they hardly represent all of china. it's a slim, slim look about the education system in china. the u.s. slipped in the rankings since 2009. scores are a little changed from the first report in 2000. what's wrong here? the report blames weak u.s. curriculum and education secretary arne duncan calls it a picture of educational stagnation. this is a reality at odds with aspirations to have the best educated work force in the world. he's pushing new common core standards in 45 states. a nationwide drive to standardize education hoping to stem the slide and reenergize american students. brooke? >> we roll on. i'm brooke baldwin here in new york with you today. news after an admission by the engineer at the controls of the speeding train tha
paying? >> well, a job that's better paying calls for a higher education. and, you know, if you don't have that, then it's hard to get a better paying job. and, you know, a lot of people cannot get a better education because of them having to work and take care of a home. >> and, mary, i understand you're also taking care of a daughter with a heart condition, two grandchildren. how old are you, if you don't mind me asking? >> i'm 59 years old. >> and, mary, i imagine then trying to move up in this position, as you say, without the access to education that could enable you to get another job is a huge problem potentially. when you began working all of those years ago, did you have a different outcome in mind? >> yes, i did. i never thought it would get worse. i've always felt that it would get better instead of worse. but it has made a turnaround. >> i want to also, mary, just give you -- let you listen to an interview we had yesterday with jamie richardson. he's a white castle vice president. we said to him, jamie, what would happen if the minimum wage were raised to $15 an hour for
educated, sophisticated man. he knew white south africa, black south africa, poor south africa, wealthy south africa. one of his supporters said at the time when they were looking for a leader for this mass movement, in walks this six foot two inch massive demand. they said, yup, he is the one. mandela said at one of his first meetings, he stood in the room with the elders and said, i will be the first black president of south africa. he said that in the 1950s. >> and in south africa in recent line, what it was like to up in 1994, that first election. they still had tears in their eyes, still very vivid to them. legacy ofd that the nelson mandela would not be enough, that there was still a lot of work to be done in south africa. the country has problems. it is one of the leading places of rape in the country, aids is rampant. unemployment between the ages of 20 and 50 is more than 50%. but nelson mandela set the stage for the future. of them,t out the best this kind and gentle man. he always made the point, people ask, is he still angry, he said i am still angry but i made a choice. i d
's covered by most health plans. >>> there's no question the world of education isn't what it used to be. ask anyone from teachers to parents, even students themselves. a new report by the american civil liberties union of pennsylvania looked at student discipline and whether the practice of zero tolerance is actually helping or hurting students and the verdict -- well, the overly broad policy just isn't working. and joining me to discuss is broward county public school superintendent robert brunsy, president of national school services committee and psychologist wendy walsh. >> tell us what zero tolerance is and why turn away from it now? >> well, the reason why we would turn away from it is because zero tolerance policies are not effective. in 2011 in broward county, we had the largest number of stude student school-related arrests in florida. 1,062. out of that 754 of them, about 75%, were for non-violent misdemeanor offenses. these are things that would normally have been handled by schools in the past and as we see the numbers continue to grow, they just put children on a trajectory that
: the education system, the job system is not treating all americans equally. you see that in the minority numbers. some of the callers have talked about this. anyou're going into environment where you are the orst person of this race gender in that role, how much more difficult is it for you to break in as opposed to a workforce that is more diverse? host: you look at the overall but the number%, approaches numeral seven percent because of the increase in african-american unemployed and teenagers. correct? guest: that is part of the factors. you have much higher unemployment among minorities and younger people. you also look at it based on educational breakdowns. the unemployment rate is considerably higher among those who have not completed high school compared to those who have completed college. work isic morath's available online. thank you for being with us. coming up next, the vice president is back in the u.s. following a weeklong trip that included stops in china, south korea, and japan. we will have david lampton joining us from johns hopkins to discuss the state of relations between the
experience or they will exchange out for education, for a couple of the years. a lot of people coming out of college may have part-time jobs elsewhere or going through a difficult economic time with the job market that it has recently been, how do we have the ability to get that experience? a lot of young people are looking for jobs to be able to get that experience and learn obvious job training that maybe they are not getting through their college career. what is your college background and are you still paying off college loans? caller: i am. i just finished my masters degree. i am currently employed at i has been in the job market, i have been in the professionals setting since i was 16 years old. i spent a lot of time building that experience, maybe not making as much as other people. if i am thankful i have had that ability to get that experience. i am finding a lot of young people participate in clubs and organizations, whether or not they are getting paid or getting whatever they can to get a tiny bit of experience on their resume. aret of companies out there looking for 5, 10, 10
. you went to where. >> never mind. >> oh, my god tell me all these educated people on the set what is he trying to say. >> i went to alabama so i can probably explain it better than anybody else. boy that cuts like a knife. >> tell me, what is the concept. >> we don't know how to kick a field goal when we're at the 15 yard line. >> great game. >> is anyone here? >> kicked the ball -- 59 yard kick but we don't kick a 15 yard field goal. anyway, so let me just say there were a lot of people -- i'm going to say two things so you can't jump on me after i say the first thing. okay. >> okay. >> number one i hate to be harold ford everybody told us back in 1996 when we tried to pass welfare reform and limit the number of weeks, months, years people could be on welfare that we were the most cold hearted hateful people of all time and young children would starve and grand mothers would be thrown out in the snow. we were. we were called the most heartless people of all time. we passed it over two bill clinton wes to. he signed at any time third time. most everybody said that it was a great s
to give them a better shot. martha: increase the inmum wage and increase childhood education. >> he spoke as if he hadn't been president. he spoke as if he's on the outside of his own presidency. he has been president for five years. what we have seen in the speech and what we'll continue to see is more class warfare because this is who he is. he is a leftist and essentially a socialist. so he believes in waging the class warfare. when he talks about -- when he spoke about the american dream he has a warped leftist view of that dream. he believes the state should use its to force greater income he:quality. when government do that it's essentially called communism. the american dream is built on limited government and economic freedom. policies can be put in place, growth policies, tax cuts, corporate taxes being cut to get that growth going so everybody has an equal shot at prosperity. martha: let's take a look at some of these numbers. just verbally -- 1 per when asked what's the most important issue to you? 1% of the 18-29-year-olds thought that was important. jobs, unemployment rate, 7
work, over 400 people are promoted every day. healthcare starting under $40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. . >>> one prominent political so, with chevy's black friday sale, the price you see is the price you pay? yep, best prices of the year. i can't see. honey. [ laughs ] brad. yeah? what are you doing? uh... hi. hi. [ male announcer ] it's the chevy black friday sale. during the chevy black friday sale, get this malibu ls for under $20,000 or this cruze ls for around $17,000. hurry. the best prices of the year end monday, december 2nd. >>> no meet the press" is back with ourolitical roundtable. chuck todd, stephanie rawlings-blake, andrea mitchell. >> welcome, stephanie rawlings-blake, mayor of baltimore, first time on "meet the press." mayor since 2010, serves on the national democratic committee as well. nice to have you here. >> nice to be here. >> the question is how good are things, really, and chuck
. i'm just trying to safe you a little money. my job is not just to entertain you, but to educate you. so call me at 1-800-743-cnbc. leave it to twitter to produce the ultimate question that is defining this stock market. including today where the dow sank 78 points. s&p back 7.2%. at jim query, would you buy amazon here? my quick response, two very different questions, yes and no. that's right. yes, i would buy amazon. no, it's not worth $400. welcome to the world of bull market discipline. the discipline to buy stocks that aren't cheap but are right. a discipline that will be tested in the next few days. at last because of today's last hour 7 sell-off -- >> sell, sell, sell! >> that shook people out of their complacency. i'm talking about the rigger to recognize what the market actually wants, though, not necessarily what you want. the dichotomy says you would rather have a portfolio that is hated and making money than be bound by concerns that may not be as relevant as they should be. let's start with amazon, which hit at an all-time high today, $399 before being repelled along wit
thought what you said was well done. same thing about people not wanting to fund education, not wanting to continue funding medicare and social security at current levels. people who want to destroy food for poor people by cutting $40 billion from food stamps, these same people actually can say that there is no racism in america? the same people who made sure it is difficult for people of color and minorities in general to have their vote counted. it is just ridiculous that people would actually make a statement like that and believe that someone would take them seriously. >> you know, dana, when you look at the record, when you look at the fact that their attempt to quote, reach out to minority voters has failed repeatedly this year, look at the fact republicans turned down the offer to speak -- any of them -- at the 50th anniversary of dr. martin luther king's i have a dream speech. and ted cruz praised jesse helms. comparing obama care to slavery. even sarah palin embraced the term shuck and jive. i mean, these kind of outreach attempts are the most backfiring i've seen in american p
's still a lot of problems. there's defacto segregation, economic problems, educational problems that south africa needs to advance on in order to realize the society that nelson mandela had in mind for south africa. being in south africa, the folks there, from all different colors, all different backgrounds, all different socioeconomic levels they are talking about these things and really feel like together they will be able to do so much more. >> abc's lana zak, thank you so much. >> the coverage of nelson mandela's life and death does not end here. see how his story influenced pop culture and moviemakers later in this half hour. >>> another headline, the investigation in to she shooting of an american teacher in libya. ronnie smith gunned down while jogging at a u.s. consulate in benghazi. his murder comes days after al qaeda called for libyan attacks on u.s. interests. smith's wife and son returned to the u.s. for the holidays. he was set to join them next week. >>> a wicked storm slamming the nation this morning is far from over. a treacherous mix of snow and sleet crippling the south
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